Let’s say you’re also an incredibly stressed person who works 60+ hours per week, leaving little time for socialization or hobbies. You might think, It’s just a busy time in my life. The stress will dissipate eventually. But you could be underestimating the impact stress is having on your body. After all, poorly managed stress can lead to everything from migraines, overeating, fatigue and an upset stomach to alcohol abuse, irritability and depression—not to mention diabetes.

You can control Anxiety in your mind!  Have you heard that?

Well meaning friends may say Anxiety or depression is all in your mind.  This is usually said when people have never experienced mental illness, depression, anxiety or other related problem. That is because they have not felt it, they have not had to control it. That is like saying there is no air because they can not see it.  Here are some very interesting statistic about how serious Anxiety and depression is.  (ARTICLE BLOG)

mental illness.png

Tell yourself something positive. 

Research shows that how you think about yourself can have a powerful effect on how you feel. When we perceive our self and our life negatively, we can end up viewing experiences in a way that confirms that notion. Instead, practice using words that promote feelings of self-worth and personal power. For example, instead of saying, "I'm such a loser. I won't get the job because I tanked in the interview," try, "I didn't do as well in the interview as I would have liked, but that doesn't mean I'm not going to get the job."

Exercise. 

Your body releases stress-relieving and mood-boosting endorphins before and after you work out, which is why exercise is a powerful antidote to stress, anxiety, and depression. Look for small ways to add activity to your day, like taking the stairs instead of the elevator or going on a short walk. To get the most benefit, aim for at least 30 minutes of exercise daily, and try to do it outdoors. Exposure to sunlight helps your body produce vitamin D, which increases your level of serotonin in the brain. Plus, time in nature is a proven stress reducer.

Go to bed on time. 

A large body of research has shown that sleep deprivation has a significant negative effect on your mood. Try to go to bed at a regular time each day, and practice good habits to get better sleep. These include shutting down screens for at least an hour before bed, using your bed only for sleep or relaxing activities, and restricting caffeinated drinks for the morning.

Take care of your body:

Taking care of yourself physically can improve your mental health. Be sure to:

  • Eat nutritious meals

  • Avoid cigarettes -- see Tobacco Cessation Help

  • Drink plenty of water

  • Exercise, which helps decrease depression and anxiety and improve moods

  • Get enough sleep. Researchers believe that lack of sleep contributes to a high rate of depression in college students. . 

Tell yourself something positive. 

Research shows that how you think about yourself can have a powerful effect on how you feel. When we perceive our self and our life negatively, we can end up viewing experiences in a way that confirms that notion. Instead, practice using words that promote feelings of self-worth and personal power. For instance, instead of saying: "I'm such a loser. I won't get the job because I tanked in the interview," try saying something like: "I didn't do as well in the interview as I would have liked, but that doesn't mean I'm not going to get the job."

Write down something you are grateful for. 

Gratitude has been clearly linked with improved well-being and mental health as well as happiness. The best-researched method to increase feelings of gratitude is to keep a gratitude journal or write a daily gratitude list. Generally contemplating gratitude is also effective, but you need to get regular practice to see a long-term benefit. Find something to be grateful for, let it fill your heart, and bask in that feeling.

Main Links

Sign up for newsletter

Follow Us

  • Facebook Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon
  • Blogger Social Icon

©2020 Betterherbnews | All Rights Reserved

  • Facebook